Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan
Total activity: 12
Areas of expertise
Empirical software engineering, Reference architecture, Software architecture
Research group
GESSI - Group of Software and Service Engineering
Department
Department of Information Services and Systems Engineering
E-mail
smartinezessi.upc.edu
Contact details
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Orcid
0000-0001-9928-133X Open in new window
Scopus Author ID
55363648100 Open in new window
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1 to 12 of 12 results
  • Artifacts of software reference architectures : a case study

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Franch Gutierrez, Javier; Martins Marques, Helena
    International Conference on Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering
    p. 42:1-42:10
    DOI: 10.1145/2601248.2601282
    Presentation's date: 2014-05-14
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    Context: Software reference architectures (SRA) have emerged as an approach to systematically reuse architectural knowledge and software elements in the development of software systems. Over the last years, research has been conducted to uncover the artifacts that SRAs provide in order to build software systems. However, empirical studies have not focused on providing industrial evidence about such artifacts. Aim: This paper investigates which artifacts constitute an SRA, how SRAs are designed, the potential reuse of SRA's artifacts, and how they are used in practice. Method: The study consists of a case study made in collaboration with a multinational consulting company that designs SRAs for diverse client organizations. A total of nine European client organizations that use an SRA participated in the study. We analyzed available documentation and contacted 28 practitioners. Results: In the nine analyzed projects, we observed that the artifacts that constitute an SRA are mainly software elements, guidelines and documentation. The design and implementation of SRAs are influenced by the reuse of artifacts from previous software system development and experiences, and the reuse of an SRA across different business domains may be possible when they are platform-oriented. Regarding SRAs usage, we observed that conformance checking is seldom performed. Conclusions: This study reports artifacts of SRAs as stated by practitioners in order to help software architects and scientists in the inception, design, and application of SRAs.

    Context: Software reference architectures (SRA) have emerged as an approach to systematically reuse architectural knowledge and software elements in the development of software systems. Over the last years, research has been conducted to uncover the artifacts that SRAs provide in order to build software systems. However, empirical studies have not focused on providing industrial evidence about such artifacts. Aim: This paper investigates which artifacts constitute an SRA, how SRAs are designed, the potential reuse of SRA's artifacts, and how they are used in practice. Method: The study consists of a case study made in collaboration with a multinational consulting company that designs SRAs for diverse client organizations. A total of nine European client organizations that use an SRA participated in the study. We analyzed available documentation and contacted 28 practitioners. Results: In the nine analyzed projects, we observed that the artifacts that constitute an SRA are mainly software elements, guidelines and documentation. The design and implementation of SRAs are influenced by the reuse of artifacts from previous software system development and experiences, and the reuse of an SRA across different business domains may be possible when they are platform-oriented. Regarding SRAs usage, we observed that conformance checking is seldom performed. Conclusions: This study reports artifacts of SRAs as stated by practitioners in order to help software architects and scientists in the inception, design, and application of SRAs.

  • Practical experiences in designing and conducting empirical studies in industry-academia collaboration

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Martins Marques, Helena
    International Workshop on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry
    p. 15-20
    DOI: 10.1145/2593690.2593696
    Presentation's date: 2014-06-02
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    More and more, software engineering researchers are motivated to solve real problems that bring value to industry. An example is the industry-academia collaboration described in this paper among everis, an IT consulting firm, and the GESSI research group at UPC. The goal of this paper is twofold: to evaluate the success of the collaboration, and to report the experience with conducting empirical studies in the industry and lessons learnt. We evaluated our collaboration with an existing model for technology transfer, and performed a focus group discussion to identify challenges we have faced. After initialization and alignment of the collaboration, a high maturity level has been achieved: we have obtained the first results in form of proposed solutions, scientific publications, and pilots run in real projects. In spite of this positive progress, further initiatives need to be undertaken in the last phases of the collaboration to achieve high degrees of maturity in deployment impact, industry benefit and innovativeness. Evaluating the collaboration has been positive, since we identified the next steps to be taken to achieve a high degree of technology transfer and innovation dissemination. We think it is a needed step in industry-academia collaborations in order to improve their success.

    More and more, software engineering researchers are motivated to solve real problems that bring value to industry. An example is the industry-academia collaboration described in this paper among everis, an IT consulting firm, and the GESSI research group at UPC. The goal of this paper is twofold: to evaluate the success of the collaboration, and to report the experience with conducting empirical studies in the industry and lessons learnt. We evaluated our collaboration with an existing model for technology transfer, and performed a focus group discussion to identify challenges we have faced. After initialization and alignment of the collaboration, a high maturity level has been achieved: we have obtained the first results in form of proposed solutions, scientific publications, and pilots run in real projects. In spite of this positive progress, further initiatives need to be undertaken in the last phases of the collaboration to achieve high degrees of maturity in deployment impact, industry benefit and innovativeness. Evaluating the collaboration has been positive, since we identified the next steps to be taken to achieve a high degree of technology transfer and innovation dissemination. We think it is a needed step in industry-academia collaborations in order to improve their success.

  • Best Paper Award ESELAW'13

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ameller, David; Franch Gutierrez, Javier
    Award or recognition

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    Towards supporting the adoption of software reference architectures: an empirically-grounded framework  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan
    International Doctoral Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering
    p. 1-8
    Presentation's date: 2013-10-09
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    A Software Reference Architecture (SRA) allows organizations to reuse architectural knowledge and software components in a systematic way and, therefore, to reduce costs. SRAs mainly appear in organizations in which the multiplicity of software systems (i.e., software systems developed at multiple locations, by multiple vendors and across multiple organizations) triggers a need for life-cycle support for all systems. Thus, SRAs are very attractive when organizations become large and distributed in order to develop new systems or new versions of systems. In return, organizations face the need to analyze the return-on-investment (ROI) in adopting SRAs, and to review these SRAs in order to ensure their quality and incremental improvement. The goal of this research is to envisage an empirically-grounded framework that supports organizations to decide on the adoption of SRAs and its subsequent design and suitability for the organization purposes. It helps organizations to harvest and arrange relevant evidence from the wide spectrum of involved stakeholders and available information and documentation in SRA projects. Such a framework is being shaped through an action-research approach between our research group and everis, an IT consulting firm.

    A Software Reference Architecture (SRA) allows organizations to reuse architectural knowledge and software components in a systematic way and, therefore, to reduce costs. SRAs mainly appear in organizations in which the multiplicity of software systems (i.e., software systems developed at multiple locations, by multiple vendors and across multiple organizations) triggers a need for life-cycle support for all systems. Thus, SRAs are very attractive when organizations become large and distributed in order to develop new systems or new versions of systems. In return, organizations face the need to analyze the return-on-investment (ROI) in adopting SRAs, and to review these SRAs in order to ensure their quality and incremental improvement. The goal of this research is to envisage an empirically-grounded framework that supports organizations to decide on the adoption of SRAs and its subsequent design and suitability for the organization purposes. It helps organizations to harvest and arrange relevant evidence from the wide spectrum of involved stakeholders and available information and documentation in SRA projects. Such a framework is being shaped through an action-research approach between our research group and everis, an IT consulting firm.

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    Verifying predictive services'quality with Mercury  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Franch Gutierrez, Javier; Bisbal, Jesus
    International Workshop on Academic Software Development Tools and Techniques
    p. 1-18
    Presentation's date: 2013-07-01
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    Due to the success of service technology, there are lots of services nowadays that make predictions about the future in domains such as weather forecast, stock market and bookmakers. The value delivered by these predictive services relies on the quality of their predictions. This paper presents Mercury, a tool that measures predictive service quality in the domain of weather forecast, and automates the context-dependent selection of the most accurate predictive service to satisfy a customer query. To do so, candidate predictive services are monitored so that their predictions can be eventually compared with real observations obtained from some trusted source. Mercury is a proof-of-concept to show that the selection of predictive services can be driven by the quality of their predictions. Its service-oriented architecture (SOA) aims to support the easy adaptation to other prediction domains and makes feasible its integration in self-adaptive SOA systems, as well as its direct use by end-users as a classical web application. Thoughout the paper, we show how Mercury was built.

    Due to the success of service technology, there are lots of services nowadays that make predictions about the future in domains such as weather forecast, stock market and bookmakers. The value delivered by these predictive services relies on the quality of their predictions. This paper presents Mercury, a tool that measures predictive service quality in the domain of weather forecast, and automates the context-dependent selection of the most accurate predictive service to satisfy a customer query. To do so, candidate predictive services are monitored so that their predictions can be eventually compared with real observations obtained from some trusted source. Mercury is a proof-of-concept to show that the selection of predictive services can be driven by the quality of their predictions. Its service-oriented architecture (SOA) aims to support the easy adaptation to other prediction domains and makes feasible its integration in self-adaptive SOA systems, as well as its direct use by end-users as a classical web application. Thoughout the paper, we show how Mercury was built.

  • Access to the full text
    Benefits and drawbacks of reference architectures  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Franch Gutierrez, Javier; Martins Marques, Helena
    European Congress on Software Architecture
    p. 307-310
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-39031-9_26
    Presentation's date: 2013-07-04
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    Reference architectures (RA) have been studied to create a consistent notion of what constitutes them as well as their benefits and drawbacks. How-ever, few empirical studies have been conducted to provide evidence that sup-port the claims made. To increase this evidence, this paper investigates the ac-tual industrial practice of using RAs. The study consists of a survey with 28 stakeholders from everis, a multinational consulting company based in Spain. We report the findings and contextualize them with previous research.

    Reference architectures (RA) have been studied to create a consistent notion of what constitutes them as well as their benefits and drawbacks. However, few empirical studies have been conducted to provide evidence that support the claims made. To increase this evidence, this paper investigates the actual industrial practice of using RAs. The study consists of a survey with 28 stakeholders from everis, a multinational consulting company based in Spain. We report the findings and contextualize them with previous research.

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    A framework for software reference architecture analysis and review  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Franch Gutierrez, Javier; Martins Marques, Helena; Ameller, David
    Experimental Software Engineering Latin American Workshop
    p. 89-102
    Presentation's date: 2013-04-11
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    Tight time-to-market needs pushes software companies and IT consulting firms to continuously look for techniques to improve their IT services in general, and the design of software architectures in particular. The use of soft-ware reference architectures allows IT consulting firms reusing architectural knowledge and components in a systematic way. In return, IT consulting firms face the need to analyze the return on investment in software reference architectures for organizations, and to review these reference architectures in order to ensure their quality and incremental improvement. Little support exists to help IT consulting firms to face these challenges. In this paper we present an empirical framework aimed to support the analysis and review of software reference architectures and their use in IT projects by harvesting relevant evidence from the wide spectrum of involved stakeholders.

    Tight time-to-market needs pushes software companies and IT consulting firms to continuously look for techniques to improve their IT services in general, and the design of software architectures in particular. The use of soft-ware reference architectures allows IT consulting firms reusing architectural knowledge and components in a systematic way. In return, IT consulting firms face the need to analyze the return on investment in software reference architectures for organizations, and to review these reference architectures in order to ensure their quality and incremental improvement. Little support exists to help IT consulting firms to face these challenges. In this paper we present an empirical framework aimed to support the analysis and review of software reference architectures and their use in IT projects by harvesting relevant evidence from the wide spectrum of involved stakeholders.

    Postprint (author’s final draft)

  • REARM: a reuse-based economic model for software reference architectures

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Franch Gutierrez, Javier; Martins Marques, Helena
    International Conference on Software Reuse
    p. 97-112
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-38977-1_7
    Presentation's date: 2013
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    To remain competitive, organizations are challenged to make informed and feasible value-driven design decisions in order to ensure the quality of their software systems. However, there is a lack of support for evaluating the economic impact of these decisions with regard to software reference architectures. This damages the communication among architects and management, which can result in poor decisions. This paper aims at ameliorating this problem by presenting a pragmatic preliminary economic model to perform cost-benefit analysis on the adoption of software reference architectures as a key asset for optimizing architectural decision-making. The model is based on existing value-based metrics and economics-driven models used in other areas. A preliminary validation based on a retrospective study showed the ability of the model to support a cost-benefit analysis presented to the management of an IT consulting company. This validation involved a cost-benefit analysis related to reuse and maintenance; other qualities will be integrated as our research progresses.

    To remain competitive, organizations are challenged to make informed and feasible value-driven design decisions in order to ensure the quality of their software systems. However, there is a lack of support for evaluating the economic impact of these decisions with regard to software reference architectures. This damages the communication among architects and management, which can result in poor decisions. This paper aims at ameliorating this problem by presenting a pragmatic preliminary economic model to perform cost-benefit analysis on the adoption of software reference architectures as a key asset for optimizing architectural decision-making. The model is based on existing value-based metrics and economics-driven models used in other areas. A preliminary validation based on a retrospective study showed the ability of the model to support a cost-benefit analysis presented to the management of an IT consulting company. This validation involved a cost-benefit analysis related to reuse and maintenance; other qualities will be integrated as our research progresses.

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    A reuse-based economic model for software reference architectures  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Franch Gutierrez, Javier
    Date: 2012-11-13
    Report

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    The growing size and complexity of software systems, together with critical time-to-market needs, demand new software engineering approaches for software development. To remain competitive, organizations are challenged to make informed and feasible value-driven design decisions in order to ensure the quality of the systems. However, there is a lack of support for evaluating the economic impact of these decisions with regard to software reference architectures. This damages the communication among architects and management, which can result in poor decisions. This paper aims at opening a path in this direction by presenting a pragmatic preliminary economic model to perform cost-benefit analysis on the adoption of software reference architectures as key asset for optimizing architectural decision-making. A preliminary validation based on a retrospective study showed the ability of the model to support a cost-benefit analysis presented to the management of an IT consulting company.

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    Conducting empirical studies on reference architectures in IT consulting firms  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Ameller, David; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Franch Gutierrez, Javier; Terradellas Fernandez, Xavier
    Date: 2012-04-17
    Report

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    Tight time-to-market needs pushes IT consulting firms (ITCFs) to continuously look for techniques to improve their IT services in general, and the design of software architectures in particular. The use of reference architectures allows ITCFs reusing architectural knowledge and components in a systematic way. In return, ITCFs face the need to assess these reference architectures in order to ensure their quality, return on investment and incremental improvement. Little support exists to help ITCFs to face this challenge. In this work-in-progress paper we present an empirical framework aimed to assess ITCFs’ reference architectures and their use in IT projects by harvesting relevant evidence from the wide spectrum of involved stakeholders. We are currently applying this framework in an ITCF and we report the issues found so far.

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    QuPreSS: A service-oriented framework for predictive services quality assessment  Open access

     Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Bisbal Riera, Jesús; Franch Gutierrez, Javier
    International Conference on Knowledge Management in Organizations
    p. 525-536
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-30867-3_47
    Presentation's date: 2012
    Presentation of work at congresses

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    Nowadays there are lots of predictive services for several domains such as stock market and bookmakers. The value delivered by these services relies on the quality of their predictions. This paper presents QuPreSS, a general framework which measures predictive service quality and guides the selection of the most accurate predictive service. To do so, services are monitored and their predictions are compared over time by means of forecast verification with observations. A systematic literature review was performed to design a service-oriented framework architecture that fits into the current body of knowledge. The service-oriented nature of the framework makes it extensible and interoperable, being able to integrate existing services regardless their heterogeneity of platforms and languages. Finally, we also present an instantiation of the generic framework architecture for the weather forecast domain, freely available at http://gessi.lsi.upc. edu/qupress/

    Postprint (author’s final draft)

  • Producción de software orientado a servicios basada en requisitos: la parte no funcional

     Carvallo Vega, Juan Pablo; Quer, Carme; Marco Gomez, Jordi; Costal Costa, Maria Dolors; Botella Lopez, Pere; Ayala Martinez, Claudia Patricia; Burgues Illa, Xavier; Ameller, David; Lopez Cuesta, Lidia; Cares, Carlos; Oriol Hilari, Marc; Palomares Bonache, Cristina; Ribó Balust, Josep M.; colomer collell, daniel; Collell, Oriol; Martinez Fernandez, Silverio Juan; Franch Gutierrez, Javier
    Competitive project

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